Wednesday, 7 March 2012

Kony 2012



Very important. Visit the website after watching if you want to get involved.

UPDATE: Debate has become rife regarding the documentary, please add any links/opinions on the topic in the comments below!

**FURTHER UPDATE: And the plot thickens... Is Oil the Real Motivation Behind Kony 2012 Campaign? I would love to hear more opinions on the topic.

8 comments:

finntje said...

Whilst I do sympathise with this cause, and agree that the internet is an incredible tool which we should utilise for spreading awareness, I do believe we should also be aware of the darker side of this whole campaign. A couple of really interesting links have come out of this: http://visiblechildren.tumblr.com/ http://ilto.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/the-visible-problem-with-invisible-children/ and http://www.wrongingrights.com/2009/03/worst-idea-ever.html/
Makes one question whether the military intervention Invisible Children are calling for is really the best course of action. Nevertheless the response so far has been overwhelming and has sparked debate and, I'm sure, soon action over the situation in Uganda.

Anonymous said...

an interesting read:

http://sammhayden.tumblr.com/post/18893649585/instead-of-mindlessly-promoting-read-this-and-educate

Megan said...

finntje - Yes I also came across those links, and naturally such a controversial issue will raise debate! I must admit their 'army for peace' angle left a slightly bad taste in my mouth and brought to mind the quote “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” ― Martin Luther King Jr. The key, for me, is the awareness, and I think the Kony 2012 campaign is an example of some serious marketing genius - which I support in that it gives young people a way to relate to charities and causes where perhaps they were previously blind to them. This awareness will undoubtedly bring to light the practices of the charity itself, which we as 'the people' will be able to condemn or support. Before dolling out money, wearing merchandise or sticking up posters it is vital to know how your support is translating into action. However I still think it is important that this video is watched and shared. Thanks for your input!

Anon - Important to be informed, so thanks for sharing!

Megan said...

This is a response from IC regarding criticism: http://s3.amazonaws.com/www.invisiblechildren.com/critiques.html - just to add to the debate!

Charlotte said...

Unfortunately it's not that easy. I got involved because you posted the video only to find massive criticism about the organization afterwards. I rarely do that but I advocate that you remove the video as the money should probably go to worthier causes.

Megan said...

Charlotte - I'm really sorry you feel that way, perhaps I didn't take on board the fact that people might participate based on my posting of the video alone, without doing any of their own research. That is my fault and I apologise. However, I won't be removing the video because I believe that it, coupled with the comments and links below it, should be seen and shared. Also, just because an organisation receives criticism does not necessarily make it less worthy; whether we condemn or support such an organisation we should be careful that we aren't just jumping on a bandwagon - and I am reminding myself of that as much as anyone else!

It isn’t my intention to make anyone feel cheated or misled, I only share information and media that interests me. Please email me if you want to talk this through further? Thank you for reading and commenting.

Megan said...

A word from The Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/uganda/9131469/Joseph-Kony-2012-growing-outrage-in-Uganda-over-film.html

Amber-Rose Thomas said...

I understand how people will have issues with Invisible Children supporting the Ugandan military when there have been so many bad things said about them.

However, in war, neither side is ultimately guilt free - and I'm sure many bad things were done by both British and American armed forces during wars in the previous century in the name of peace and (dare I say it) the greater good?

It is an issue certainly worth looking in to - and I certainly would not recommend taking either the video release, or any of the bad press about it at face value. However I don't think anyone can try to pretend that Joseph Kony hasn't done some awful things and doesn't deserve justice

Personally? I support the Invisible Children campaign and encourage the awareness they are trying to bring about for this cause. But that is just my opinion. If anyone chooses to act or else not to act after watching this video it is up to them.

Thank you, Megan. Not only for posting it in the first place - but for posting the updates since in order to offer people more up to date knowledge on the topic.

Post a Comment